Posts

Your Part of the Problem

You’re Part of the Problem

Scuba professionals, you’re part of the problem. Good news is, you’re also part of the solution.

ERDI Equivalency Chart

Public Safety Diver Equivalences from Dive Training Agencies, DRI, LGS, PADI, SSI, IANTD, PSDA, NAUI, RESCUE 3

This chart compares ERDI certifications with other public safety dive training agencies

FDIC-Followup

FDIC 2016 Follow Up

If you are in the public safety community and you have never had the chance to attend FDIC, you should make the effort.

Leading Causes of Death for Public Safety Divers

Over the past year or so, I have been on a mission to figure out what the health risks are to public safety divers, what is causing injuries, why they are dying, and what ERDI can do to help prevent these accidents from happening.

Scubility Taken to All Corners of the Globe

Teaching or assisting divers with disabilities requires an alternative view and approach but in the end is extremely rewarding.

3 Shorts

Recently, there has been a large increase in the number of accidents involving dive boats backing down on or running over divers. This of course is not limited to the US; these cases span the globe.

The Difference Between Tech and Sport

Some of the differences between technical and sport, if applied by sport divers, would actually make sport divers better divers.

4 Things I wish I’d Known Before My First Tech Dive

by Sean Harrison:
Tech dive

As I look back on the days when I first started tech diving, two things come to mind that have had significant changes – equipment and logistics. There have been such dramatic changes in equipment it is hard to highlight them all. The early tech equipment was nothing more than standard equipment that was reconfigured to meet our needs, it was not specialized, light weight, easier breathing at deeper depths or made of special metals. And we certainly did not have rebreathers, those did not come ‘til the late 90’s. Logistics, on the other hand, has gotten better but can still be a little tricky. My tech diving started in the mid-Atlantic states of the US where there were several boats that would take us to deeper wrecks and allow us to stay a little longer in the water. We also had a hard time getting the gas fills we needed for the planned dives. Things have gotten better in this aspect but here is a list of things to be aware of if you are considering getting involved in tech diving or have recently learned to tech dive.

1. Boats – not all boats are created equal. Dive boat operators as a general rule rely on the number of divers they take out per day, pretty simply math – the more divers they take out, the more money they make. When boat operators take out tech divers they will usually reduce the number of divers on their boat (space for additional equipment) and stay out a little longer to allow for decompression or rebreather divers – this means you may pay a little more to do tech dives off of boats. This also means you need to speak with the boat operator and make sure you can do the dives you want to do off their boats. Mixing tech divers with sport divers normally does not produce good results.

2. I have to go! – tech dives are not always deep but they are almost always longer than your average sport dive. Longer dives means better exposure protection (even in warmer water) read: dry suit, which means no peeing in the water, or does it. TDI recently released two good articles on this:

The P-Valve Struggle »
Girls Pee, Too »

The short version of these articles is, it is important to stay hydrated while diving and with hydration comes nature’s call. Lots of options to manage this situation so do your research before your next long dive.

3. I’m hungry – anybody that knows me knows I love my food and after a few hours in the water, I surface ready to eat! Diving burns calories and the colder the water the more calories burned. Tech diving from boats in many places also means longer boat rides, so getting back to the dock is not going to happen as fast as it does on sport dive boats. Bring along some good snacks or a sandwich to get you back to the dock. If you have a good snack on the boat ride back, you will be able to get started on the monster nap sooner.

4. Bring on the gadgets – not so fast. Tech divers are certainly gear geeks but they also tend to be minimalists and only bring what they need. A big part of what allows us to tech dive and stay underwater longer is minimizing air consumption; carrying more gadgets means not being as streamlined and increases air consumption. As you select gear, think about what kind of diving you will be doing, cave divers don’t need what wreck divers do and cold water wreck divers don’t need what warm water ocean wreck divers do. Also think about where it is going to go on your body or configuration. Too many things stacked on top of each other means you may not be able to access it when you need it.

If you are a planner or someone that likes to work through scenarios, technical diving is right up your alley. Plan out your dives, call the boat operators or local stores (if you can do the dives from shore) and find out what sort of support they can provide. If you will be diving from a boat, make sure you are clear with the operator what kind of dive you want to do and see if they will do it. Planning ahead is critical when it comes to rebreathers and traveling, not all locations support all rebreathers. Make an equipment check list and go through it before every dive/trip, with tech diving comes more equipment which equals more things to forget. Make sure that check also includes a save-a-dive kit, and that the spare parts now include the ones you need for tech diving. Plan ahead and have fun. A spontaneous tech dive can result in a spontaneous disaster. If you have not yet taken a tech diving course, consider signing up for the TDI Intro to Tech Course. This course will give a great overview of what to expect and what you will need.

What’s Your Life Worth? – Part 2

by Sean Harrison:
diver down
The “What’s Your Life Worth?” series is not intended to scare people; it is intended to provoke thought and some introspective viewing as well as self analysis. The intended end goal is to increase safety and reduce the likelihood of an accident. Keep this in mind as you read the series because while specifics could be pointed out (there is an unlimited number of examples unfortunately) the illustrations are written in a broad swipe and I have been careful not to write them in such a way as to combine accidents as if they were one occurrence. In this piece I am going to get back to the very beginning of the decision making process, the first step, if you will. What are you willing to pay for a course?

Course costs and what is included in those costs run the gamut, but one element that does not is what it takes to make a proficient and competent diver at any given level. To create a proficient diver at any level four key areas have to be covered: the basics of learning which involve knowledge development, applied skills, repetition, and muscle memory. Sounds easy right? Well it is, but it does not happen fast.

Everybody learns at a different pace and in different ways, meaning: time is required for the instructor to figure how the student learns and to ensure short term and long term comprehension. Unlike some learning events, scuba diving also requires skill performances which add another layer to the learning process – muscle memory. Muscle memory is so critical to diving that it should be considered life threatening if it is not achieved. Here is a basic example of what I mean by life threatening. If a diver has not practiced releasing their weight system to a point where it becomes instinctive in an emergency situation, they could drown because they cannot stay on the surface or even get to the surface. Why do I use this as an example? Because it happens time and time again, divers are found lifeless on the bottom with their weight system still in place.

Like muscle memory, knowledge retention is needed in emergency situations as well. It may not seem important when you are learning but when you need the information to make a split second decision, that’s not the time to realize “I don’t remember my instructor teaching me what to do in this situation”. Chances are good your instructor taught it or that it was covered in the materials for the course but… was enough time spent on it?

So you may be asking yourself, what does all this have to do with the cost of a course? You have heard the old saying “time is money”, well the longer it takes to achieve and ensure academic understanding and muscle memory, the more money it will cost. See, unlike many other activities you will do in your life, scuba is based on physics and physiology, two things you can never escape or defy. A few other activities also come to mind: sky diving, high altitude climbing, and rock climbing. Here is the thing with physics and physiology, you don’t need to have a complete and comprehensive understanding of them but you do need to understand the basics because every time you get into the water you enter a new realm unlike the one our bodies are adjusted to on land.

Moral of the story, don’t look for the cheapest class, it could cost you dearly later on, look for the course that is going to give you everything you need to be a competent diver at whatever level you are working towards and that includes if you are just taking your basic Open Water Diver course. Talk to the dive center or instructor and ask them: how much time do I get in the pool? How much classroom time do I get? If the answer that comes back is, “We do as little classroom and pool time as possible to keep the cost down”, find another dive center or instructor. Find the place that tells you exactly what is included in the course and gives you the response, “As much time as you need to feel comfortable”.

Diving is an amazing sport that takes you to places that some people only dream about and you get to see things that few people have seen, but it is not without its risks and that’s what makes it exciting. Do yourself and your loved ones a favor – take a quality course which comes with a slightly higher price tag. Keep in mind though that higher price tags don’t always mean quality so make sure you communicate to the dive center or instructor exactly how you feel. If you are not comfortable or feel you are not getting the training you need… let someone know.